Six Degrees of Separation: Daisy Jones and the Six to…

It’s the first Saturday of a new month and it’s time for another round of Six Degrees of Separation, that fun meme hosted by Kate at booksaremyfavouriteandbest where she gives us a title and we make a chain of six books.

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This month’s title is one that I’ve read, and it happens to be a book that I really enjoyed! It’s Daisy Jones & The Six, which was told in a unique way and tells the story of a band and a singer during the 70s. Where will Daisy lead me this month?

***this post contains affiliate links. The links to Amazon are affiliate links which means that if you click the link and make a purchase, then I will receive a small commission.***

 Daisy Jones & The Six by Taylor Jenkins Reid

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Official Synopsis from Goodreads: Everyone knows Daisy Jones & The Six: The band’s album Aurora came to define the rock ‘n’ roll era of the late seventies, and an entire generation of girls wanted to grow up to be Daisy. But no one knows the reason behind the group’s split on the night of their final concert at Chicago Stadium on July 12, 1979 . . . until now.

Daisy is a girl coming of age in L.A. in the late sixties, sneaking into clubs on the Sunset Strip, sleeping with rock stars, and dreaming of singing at the Whisky a Go Go. The sex and drugs are thrilling, but it’s the rock ‘n’ roll she loves most. By the time she’s twenty, her voice is getting noticed, and she has the kind of heedless beauty that makes people do crazy things.

Also getting noticed is The Six, a band led by the brooding Billy Dunne. On the eve of their first tour, his girlfriend Camila finds out she’s pregnant, and with the pressure of impending fatherhood and fame, Billy goes a little wild on the road.

Daisy and Billy cross paths when a producer realizes that the key to supercharged success is to put the two together. What happens next will become the stuff of legend.

The making of that legend is chronicled in this riveting and unforgettable novel, written as an oral history of one of the biggest bands of the seventies. Taylor Jenkins Reid is a talented writer who takes her work to a new level with Daisy Jones & The Six, brilliantly capturing a place and time in an utterly distinctive voice.

 

Amazon (Affiliate Link!)   |   Goodreads   |   My Review

 There are so many different ways I could go with this. Rock and roll, a forbidden romance, the name Daisy, or the seventies, but this time I’ll go with the number six:

Six of Crows by Leigh Bardugo

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Amazon (Affiliate Link!)   |   Goodreads   |   My Review

 Six of Crows is a YA Fantasy Heist book that I really loved. I’m thrilled that Netflix is making a series based on this book, and the sequel Crooked Kingdom, and the show will also cover the Grisha Trilogy as well. Thinking along the lines of linking the title and fantasy books leads me to:

A Feast for Crows by George R.R. Martin

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Amazon (Affiliate Link!)   |   Goodreads

This is one of my favorite series, and I enjoy this entry in the series. I did a re-read last year, and when I read this one (book four in the series) and book five (A Dance With Dragons), I actually followed the Boiled Leather reading order, and read both of the books at the same time, alternating chapters. I highly recommend reading the books this way if you’re doing a re-read – on a first time read I’d read them in the order written to get Martin’s full effect. When reading the two books at the same time, all of the Dorne, Jon, Greyjoy, and Dany chapters don’t bog you down. They are all interspersed quite nicely and it’s easy to follow.

Keeping in mind thrones and fantasy leads me to:

Three Dark Crowns by Kendare Blake

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Amazon (Affiliate Link!)   |   Goodreads   |   My Review

 This one is a so-so series that I haven’t gotten around to finishing yet. I enjoyed the first book, but the second had too many questions and cliffhangers, and I never got around to reading books three and four. Maybe someday! But thinking of this series which is about three sisters battling each other for the crown, brings me to another book about three sisters and royalty:

The Last Tudor by Philippa Gregory

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Amazon (Affiliate Link!)   |   Goodreads   |   My Review

 This read focuses on the Grey sisters: Jane, Katherine, and Mary. These sisters don’t battle each other like in the prior selection, but instead they care for each other, and while they aren’t all three together for that long, they have a love for each other and their family name. Loving sisters brings me to my next read, the emotional:

Before We Were Yours by Lisa Wingate

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Amazon (Affiliate Link!)   |   Goodreads   |   My Review

 Telling the story of sisters torn apart, Before We Were Yours spotlights the Tennessee Children’s Home Society and how Georgia Tann kidnapped and sold children for years. Keeping in mind kidnappings and orphans brings me to:

The Chaperone by Laura Moriarty

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Amazon (Affiliate Link!)   |   Goodreads

 This was an interesting read about a lady named Cora who chaperoned a before-she-was-famous Louise Brooks on a trip to New York City. While in NYC with Louise, Cora investigates her own family, as she was sent to the Midwest on an orphan train as a young girl. I recently watched the PBS movie starring Elizabeth McGovern as Cora, and I enjoyed the adaptation!

And yes, we’ve hit the end of the chain for this month, but I could go on further to the book Orphan Train but I think I’ll stop here before I get too carried away!


This is such an enjoyable meme! It gets me to think of linking titles, and makes me think of older reads I may have forgotten about. This month I went from historical fiction to fantasy and back to historical fiction. And none of them have anything to do with the 70s or rock stars like Daisy Jones & The Six. Oh well! That’s what makes this so much fun!

Have you read any of these titles?

 


2 thoughts on “Six Degrees of Separation: Daisy Jones and the Six to…

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